Stop: You had me at "exoskeleton." This one happens to be designed to simulate the effects of aging on the human body, including vision and hearing loss, joint inflexibility, muscle mass and so on. I don't need to simulate those things anymore, but I'd love to wander around NYC in one of these things. Of course, it's not for our personal amusement, it's for science.

The Best Gadgets on CES 2016 (part 8)

All the cool new gadgets at CES 2016.
Our picks of the hottest, coolest and most sizzling tech on show in Las Vegas.

3D Systems ChefJet Pro

There are 3D printed prosthetics and armor for animals, cars, clothes, magic wands, Skittle sorters and Popes. The list goes on. Yawn. But sugar? Hell yeah! Let 3D Systems be your techno-saccharide Svengali. We first saw the ChefJet at last year's CES, but now it's real and ready to create beautiful edibles. It costs somewhere between $5,000 and $10,000, so for home use it probably can only make its way into the kitchens of folks who can afford fridges like this.
There are 3D printed prosthetics and armor for animals, cars, clothes, magic wands, Skittle sorters and Popes. The list goes on. Yawn. But sugar? Hell yeah! Let 3D Systems be your techno-saccharide Svengali. We first saw the ChefJet at last year’s CES, but now it’s real and ready to create beautiful edibles. It costs somewhere between $5,000 and $10,000, so for home use it probably can only make its way into the kitchens of folks who can afford fridges like this.

ModiFace Mirror

For some women, trying on makeup got old by the time we graduated high school. But you really can't buy it without seeing it on your skin -- unless you don't mind wasting a lot of money. Modiface tackles this issue with a combination of software and a mirror, letting you overlay different options over your reflection. (The free ModiFace Live app for Android and iOS does something similar on your smartphone.) It won't improve your taste, but it can compensate for horrible store lighting. The mirror isn't an end-user product, but you'll likely see it at retail.
For some women, trying on makeup got old by the time we graduated high school. But you really can’t buy it without seeing it on your skin — unless you don’t mind wasting a lot of money. Modiface tackles this issue with a combination of software and a mirror, letting you overlay different options over your reflection. (The free ModiFace Live app for Android and iOS does something similar on your smartphone.) It won’t improve your taste, but it can compensate for horrible store lighting. The mirror isn’t an end-user product, but you’ll likely see it at retail.

Carl Zeiss Optics smart glass frames

Since the debut of Google Glass, the holy grail of augmented-reality glasses for everyday wear has been glasses that don't look geeky or conspicuous. Carl Zeiss Optics may have done it -- since Zeiss makes lenses rather than frames, they have to chops to embed more of the necessary technology into the polycarbonate lens, which means less in of it goes into a large, bulky frame. Of course, its still in prototype.
Since the debut of Google Glass, the holy grail of augmented-reality glasses for everyday wear has been glasses that don’t look geeky or conspicuous. Carl Zeiss Optics may have done it — since Zeiss makes lenses rather than frames, they have to chops to embed more of the necessary technology into the polycarbonate lens, which means less in of it goes into a large, bulky frame. Of course, its still in prototype.

Emicro One foldable scooter

Scooters, scooters everywhere. To me, the two most important questions about electric scooters for commuting are: how easy is it to maneuver and what do I do with it when I'm not scooting. All the other bells and whistles are secondary. The Emicro One sounds like it at least scores on both counts. It's pretty stripped down with respect to controls and it's the lightest foldable model yet -- 16.5 pounds, about the same as the cat I live with who insists upon being carried. That means you can do almost anything with it, even just tote it around when you're not using it. And you'll be able to get one this February for the about $1,000 (about £750 or AU$1,500), the typical price for these devices.
Scooters, scooters everywhere. To me, the two most important questions about electric scooters for commuting are: how easy is it to maneuver and what do I do with it when I’m not scooting. All the other bells and whistles are secondary. The Emicro One sounds like it at least scores on both counts. It’s pretty stripped down with respect to controls and it’s the lightest foldable model yet — 16.5 pounds, about the same as the cat I live with who insists upon being carried. That means you can do almost anything with it, even just tote it around when you’re not using it. And you’ll be able to get one this February for the about $1,000 (about £750 or AU$1,500), the typical price for these devices.

Genworth Aging Suit

Stop: You had me at "exoskeleton." This one happens to be designed to simulate the effects of aging on the human body, including vision and hearing loss, joint inflexibility, muscle mass and so on. I don't need to simulate those things anymore, but I'd love to wander around NYC in one of these things. Of course, it's not for our personal amusement, it's for science.
Stop: You had me at “exoskeleton.” This one happens to be designed to simulate the effects of aging on the human body, including vision and hearing loss, joint inflexibility, muscle mass and so on. I don’t need to simulate those things anymore, but I’d love to wander around NYC in one of these things. Of course, it’s not for our personal amusement, it’s for science.

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