It's a simple idea: You stick the sensor into one of the the brightly colored polygon-ball-things and it translates your tossing and shaking into music via an app on your phone. Or you stick the sensor on some moving part of your body and let your limbs do the playing. A successful Kickstarter that launched last month, it costs €80 (converted, $86, £59, AU$122) and I imagine it would be a terrific gift for a kid.

The Best Gadgets on CES 2016 (part 6)

All the cool new gadgets at CES 2016.
Our picks of the hottest, coolest and most sizzling tech on show in Las Vegas.

Phonotonic

It's a simple idea: You stick the sensor into one of the the brightly colored polygon-ball-things and it translates your tossing and shaking into music via an app on your phone. Or you stick the sensor on some moving part of your body and let your limbs do the playing. A successful Kickstarter that launched last month, it costs €80 (converted, $86, £59, AU$122) and I imagine it would be a terrific gift for a kid.
It’s a simple idea: You stick the sensor into one of the the brightly colored polygon-ball-things and it translates your tossing and shaking into music via an app on your phone. Or you stick the sensor on some moving part of your body and let your limbs do the playing. A successful Kickstarter that launched last month, it costs €80 (converted, $86, £59, AU$122) and I imagine it would be a terrific gift for a kid.

CleverPet

There are all kinds of treat dispensers, but this one will let you drive your dog or cat crazy instead of the other way around. Though it's been likened to a game console, it really has more in common with Simon than your Xbox; it flashes lights and when your pet taps the right pad, out pops a treat. I like that this is species-neutral -- it works for dogs and cats and I would imagine some other quadrupeds as well. We covered this last year while it was in its crowdfunding stage, and it's finally available for preorder. It's not cheap: $300 is a lot to spend on a cat or dog toy.
There are all kinds of treat dispensers, but this one will let you drive your dog or cat crazy instead of the other way around. Though it’s been likened to a game console, it really has more in common with Simon than your Xbox; it flashes lights and when your pet taps the right pad, out pops a treat. I like that this is species-neutral — it works for dogs and cats and I would imagine some other quadrupeds as well. We covered this last year while it was in its crowdfunding stage, and it’s finally available for preorder. It’s not cheap: $300 is a lot to spend on a cat or dog toy.

Daqri

The Daqri Smart Helmet uses its clear plastic panels to project AR, or augmented reality, onto the screen, overlaying a construction worker's view of the real world. That leaves your hands free for more important tasks than things like holding blueprints, such as making sure you've measuring the doorframe properly.
The Daqri Smart Helmet uses its clear plastic panels to project AR, or augmented reality, onto the screen, overlaying a construction worker’s view of the real world. That leaves your hands free for more important tasks than things like holding blueprints, such as making sure you’ve measuring the doorframe properly.

Samsung’s 170-inch modular TV

Every year, some TV manufacturer has to win "biggest!" You may not have enough wall space -- or a big enough budget -- for this 12-foot-diagonal screen, but it's comforting to know that it's technologically possible.
Every year, some TV manufacturer has to win “biggest!” You may not have enough wall space — or a big enough budget — for this 12-foot-diagonal screen, but it’s comforting to know that it’s technologically possible.

Samsung’s curved 98-inch 8K TV

Billed as the biggest 8K curved SUHD TV in the world, this massive set is supposedly shipping in 2016. It will probably be another few years before there's any content worth displaying on it, but this is exactly what CES is all about.
Billed as the biggest 8K curved SUHD TV in the world, this massive set is supposedly shipping in 2016. It will probably be another few years before there’s any content worth displaying on it, but this is exactly what CES is all about.

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